Psychology

Description

The Grawemeyer Award in Psychology is given to those who are responsible for works that present new and creative ideas with clarity and power—ideas that substantially impact the field of psychology. These ideas help us understand one another and the world around us, providing insights into the human mind.

The purpose of this annual award is to acknowledge and disseminate outstanding ideas in all areas of psychological science. The award is designed to recognize a specific idea, rather than a lifetime of accomplishment.

The Prize
The Grawemeyer Award in Psychology is accompanied by a prize of $100,000, which is presented in full during the awards ceremony.

Eligibility
Ideas eligible for nomination may have an individual author or authors. The award is designed to recognize a specific idea, rather than a lifetime of achievement.  The competition does not limit the format in which the idea appears. Consistent with the intent of H. Charles Grawemeyer, the award is not given posthumously.

History

The Grawemeyer Fund, housed at the University of Louisville, added psychology in 2001 to its distinguished list of awards categories. The University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology is given annually and is accompanied by a prize of not less than $100,000.

The Grawemeyer award recognizes outstanding ideas in all areas of the discipline of Psychology. Nominations are judged on the basis of originality, creativity, scientific merit, and breadth of impact on the field of Psychology.

Charles Grawemeyer, an industrialist, engineer and entrepreneur from Louisville, Ky., had a life-long passion for music, education and religious studies. Consequently, he chose to honor ideas in the arts, humanities and sciences. Rather than rewarding recent or lifetime personal achievements, Grawemeyer wanted to recognize single powerful ideas or creative works.

Professor Woody Petry directs the Psychology Grawemeyer Committee that conducts the nomination and awards process. Other committee members include Professors Cara Cashon, Zijiang He, and Tamara Newton from the University of Louisville Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences.

How to Enter

The Nomination Process
The University invites nominations from throughout the world by individuals, professional associations, university presidents and administrators, and publishers or editors of journals and books in psychology. Self-nominations are not accepted.

To make a nomination, the nominator must submit the following:

  • A one or two page letter in English identifying the specific idea being nominated, the author(s) of the idea, and why the idea merits the award.
  • A current mailing address, telephone number, fax number and e-mail address for the nominee(s).

Deadline for Nominations
To be considered for the 2016 award, the nomination letter must be received by February 16, 2015.

Send nominations by regular mail, fax, or e-mail to:

Ms. Leisa Hillman, Program Coordinator
Grawemeyer Award in Psychology
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences
University of Louisville
Louisville, KY 40292
U.S.A.
Telephone: (502) 852-0430
Fax: (502) 852-8904
E-Mail: grawemeyer.psychology@louisville.edu

Supporting Materials for Review
Further supporting materials will be requested directly from the nominee(s).  Nominees will be sent a nominee agreement explaining the award conditions.

Each nominee must then submit the following supporting materials. (Note that items 2-4 must be submitted in electronic format on a CD)

  1. A signed copy of the nominee agreement
  2. A one-page statement of the idea.
  3. The nominee’s curriculum vitae (in English).
  4. Supporting documents (publications, reviews, etc. in English)
  5. Three (3) copies of relevant books

Criteria for judging Nominations
Nominations will be judged on the basis of originality, creativity, scientific merit and breadth of impact on the discipline of Psychology.

The Review Process
The Grawemeyer Award Committee of the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences will review the submissions and select 8 to 12 ideas for further consideration. These submissions will be forwarded to an External Review Panel who will select three submissions to be recommended to the University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award Committee. This latter committee will recommend the award winner to the President of the University, who will forward the recommendation to the Board of Trustees of the University.  The Board of Trustees will grant the award.

Awardee Requirements
The winner will be announced publicly in December 2015. In addition to requirements specified on the nominee agreement, acceptance of the award requires personal delivery of a public address at the University of Louisville that conveys the importance of the winning idea. Winners must also participate for two to four days in community and campus events associated with the award ceremonies in April of the Award year.

For More Information Contact:
Dr. Heywood M. Petry, Director
Grawemeyer Award in Psychology
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences
University of Louisville
Louisville, KY 40292
U.S.A.
Telephone: (502) 852-6031
Fax: (502) 852-8904
E-Mail: woody.petry@louisville.edu

Previous Winners

2015 – James McGaugh

A brain scientist who helped explain how our emotions affect what we learn and remember has won the 2015 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology.

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2014 – Damasio wins Grawemeyer psychology award

A California scholar who proposed that emotions play an integral role in human reasoning and decision-making has won the 2014 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology. Antonio Damasio, a psychology, neuroscience and neurology professor at the University of Southern California, received the prize for his somatic marker hypothesis, a proposal that emotions influence the way people make decisions.

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2013 – Irving Gottesman

A mental health pioneer who explored the basis of schizophrenia and the way mental disorders are classified has won the 2013 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology.

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2012 – Leslie Ungerleider and Mortimer Mishkin

Leslie Ungerleider and Mortimer Mishkin, two National Institute of Mental Health researchers, have won the 2012 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology for their “what and where” idea of how the brain works.

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2011 – Walter Mischel

Good things come to those who wait. A scientist who showed that willpower can be learned–and that it carries lifelong benefits–has won the 2011 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology.

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2010 – Ronald Melzack

A scientist who broadened the understanding of how we experience pain – and ways we can control and relieve it – has won the 2010 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology.

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2009 – Anne Treisman

A scientist who helped explain how our brains build meaningful images from the bits of information we see won the 2009 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award in Psychology.

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2008 – Albert Bandura

People who believe in themselves can raise their aspirations, motivation and accomplishments and are more apt to try new things by watching others do them. So says Albert Bandura, a Stanford University professor of social science in psychology who won the 2008 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology.

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2007 – Giacomo Rizzolatti, Vittorio Gallese and Leonardo Fogassi

The old saying “monkey see, monkey do” also applies to human behavior, say a trio of Italian scientists who earned the 2007 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology.

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2006 – John O’Keefe and Lynn Nadel

How do people know where they are and how they got there? Two scientists who have helped identify the brain’s mapping system earned the 2006 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology.

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2005 – Elizabeth Loftus

A psychologist noted for her study of human memory and how it can be altered has won the 2005 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology.

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2004 – Aaron Beck

A psychiatrist considered to be the founder of cognitive therapy — and credited with its approach of helping people learn techniques to help themselves — has won the 2004 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology.

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2003 – Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky

Working as a team for nearly three decades, the psychologists revolutionized the scientific approach to decision making, ultimately affecting all social sciences and many related disciplines.

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2002 – James McClelland and David Rumelhart

Two pioneers in the field of cognitive neuroscience have won the 2002 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology.

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2001 – Michael Posner, Marcus Raichle and Steven Petersen

Three pioneers in the field of cognitive neuroscience won the 2001 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology.

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2015 Recipient

James McGaugh

A brain scientist who helped explain how our emotions affect what we learn and remember has won the 2015 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology.

University of California-Irvine neurobiology and behavior research professor James McGaugh received the prize for discovering that stress hormones such as epinephrine and cortisol play a critical part in determining why we remember some things more vividly than others.

The hormones activate the brain’s emotional center, the amygdala, which in turn regulates other brain areas that process and consolidate memories – a sequence that explains why our emotional experiences are easier to recall, he found. Read more…

Video Interviews with Past Recipients

The Link Between Emotion and Memory
2015 Psychology Recipient James McGaugh

The Role of Emotions in Decision-Making
2014 Psychology Recipient Antonio Damasio

The Basis of Schizophrenia and How to Classify Mental Disorders
2013 Psychology Recipient Irving Gottesman

The “What and Where” of How the Brain Works
2012 Psychology Recipients Leslie Ungerleider and Mortimer Mishkin

Good Things Come to Those Who Wait
2011 Psychology Recipient Walter Mischel

Gate Control Theory of Pain
2010 Psychology Recipient Ronald Melzack

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