Category: News

1991 – John Harwood Hick

Dr. John Harwood Hick, Danforth Professor and Chairman of the Department of Religion at Claremont Graduate School (California), is the 1991 award winner. He is also Director of the James A. Blaisdell Programs in World Religions and Cultures at Claremont. Based on his 1986-87 Gifford Lectures, Professor Hick, in “An Interpretation of Religion: Human Responses […]

1991 – The United Nations World Commission on Environment and Development

Economic development and sustained growth in the world’s standard of living cannot occur without a strong, global effort to protect the environment. That belief is the basis for Our Common Future, a seminal 1987 report by the United Nations World Commission on Environment and Development, which has earned the 1991 award. Chaired by former Norwegian […]

1991 – Kieran Egan

“Teachers of young children need to be, above all, storytellers.” That idea, espoused in Kieran Egan’s book, “Primary Understanding: Education in Early Childhood,” has earned the Canadian author the 1991 award. Kieran Egan, a professor of education at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, British Columbia, identifies four sequential stages of human understanding: the Mythic, the […]

1991 – John Corigliano

The pain, anger and frustration of watching friends suffer and die of AIDS led to the creation of John Corigliano’s “Symphony No. 1,” winner of the 1991 award. The piece, commissioned by the Chicago Symphony orchestra, premiered March 15, 1990. Corigliano said the composition was inspired by “The Quilt,” an exhibit of thousands of interwoven […]

1990 – E.P. Sanders

Dr. E. P. Sanders, a professor at Oxford University, is the first recipient of the Louisville Grawemeyer Award in Religion. This award is presented jointly by Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary and the University of Louisville. In his 1985 book Jesus and Judaism, Dr. Sanders carefully, clearly and unpretentiously explores a simple but profound idea. Jesus […]

1990 – Robert Jervis

The possibility of mutual destruction of the United States and the Soviet Union in nuclear war has changed the psychology of statesmanship. That’s the concept expressed by Robert Jervis, a political science professor at Columbia University and winner of the 1990 award. In his 1989 book, The Meaning of Nuclear Revolution: Statecraft and the Prospect […]

1990 – Howard Gardner

Everyone has at least seven intelligences, most of which are overlooked by standard IQ tests. That’s the theory advanced by Howard Gardner, an educational psychologist at Harvard University who has won the 1990 award. In his 1983 book, “Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences,” Gardner distinguishes seven kinds of human intelligence: linguistic, musical, […]

1990 – Joan Tower

Flowing instrumental solos combine with tension-building momentum in Joan Tower’s “Silver Ladders,” winner of the 1990 award. The 22-minute orchestral work, commissioned by the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra and Meet the Composer Inc., premiered on Jan. 9, 1987. “Its many upward-moving lines suggest nothing so much as a giant ladder, reaching to the sky and […]

1989 – Robert Keohane

What’s the best way to encourage the nations of the world to cooperate? Economic agencies such as the International Monetary Fund and World Bank may offer the most hope, according to Robert Keohane, a political scientist at Duke University and recipient of the 1989 award. In his award-winning book, After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in […]

1989 – Bertrand Schwartz

Action first, knowledge after. That’s one of the principles behind a job training program developed by French educator Bertrand Schwartz, whose innovations in social and vocational preparation for disadvantaged youth earned him the 1989 award. “Knowledge only comes into the picture as required by the doing process,” Schwartz said in a 1987 lecture delivered in […]