Category: World Order

1994 – Mikhail Gorbachev

Mikhail Gorbachev, former president of the Soviet Union, was named the winner of the 1994 Award for Ideas Improving World Order. Gorbachev was chosen to receive the award in Spring 1994 but, due to scheduling conflicts, was unable to come to Louisville to present his ideas until October 5, 1995. Gorbachev was honored for his December […]

1993 – Donald Harman Akenson

Ireland, South Africa and Israel may seem worlds apart. But similarities among groups in these politically troubled countries help explain why they cannot maintain peace within their borders. The similarities also can help predict the events that lie ahead, says Donald Harman Akenson, winner of the 1993 award. In his 1992 book, God’s Peoples: Covenant […]

1992 – Samuel Huntington, Herman Daly and John Cobb

  One explores the reasons behind and the future for worldwide democratization; the other suggests the “growth is good” mentality of modern society is leading to the demise of the human race. Both are ideas that will be vital to world order in coming years. For that reason, Samuel Huntington, author of The Third Wave: […]

1991 – The United Nations World Commission on Environment and Development

Economic development and sustained growth in the world’s standard of living cannot occur without a strong, global effort to protect the environment. That belief is the basis for Our Common Future, a seminal 1987 report by the United Nations World Commission on Environment and Development, which has earned the 1991 award. Chaired by former Norwegian […]

1990 – Robert Jervis

The possibility of mutual destruction of the United States and the Soviet Union in nuclear war has changed the psychology of statesmanship. That’s the concept expressed by Robert Jervis, a political science professor at Columbia University and winner of the 1990 award. In his 1989 book, The Meaning of Nuclear Revolution: Statecraft and the Prospect […]

1989 – Robert Keohane

What’s the best way to encourage the nations of the world to cooperate? Economic agencies such as the International Monetary Fund and World Bank may offer the most hope, according to Robert Keohane, a political scientist at Duke University and recipient of the 1989 award. In his award-winning book, After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in […]

1988 – Richard Neustadt and Ernest May

Contemporary political leaders should look to the past for help in tackling the world’s problems. That idea, proposed by two Harvard professors who have both served as top government advisors, claimed the 1988 award. Richard E. Neustadt, a professor of government at Harvard’s JFK School of Government, and Ernest R. May, a history professor at […]